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Growing and Caring for Bonsai Trees

Growing and Caring for Bonsai Trees

Bonsai in Singapore - The History of Bonsai

Bonsai in Singapore


The Chinese were trading in Singapore as early as the thirteenth century (back when it was still known as Temasek), although once the old port city was sacked and abandoned in the late fourteenth century, the local population dwindled dramatically and few Chinese (if any) would be interested in settling in Singapore, even as they continued to trade in the region.

Large-scale Chinese immigration to Singapore took place only after Sir Stamford Raffles established a trading post in 1819. What is interesting though was that there were already a small community of Chinese living in Singapore before Raffles arrived. According to Singapore: A 700-Year History, they were Teochew farmers who moved from the nearby island of Bintan to Singapore to grow gambier and pepper.

Once the new port was established though, it quickly attracted many Chinese traders in the region, and there were already an estimated 1,159 Chinese in Singapore as early as 1821 out of a total population of 4,727 (according to One Hundred Years of Singapore). It's believed that the first Penjing Bonsai came to Singapore via established trade routes. Some Penjing Bonsai were already on display at some buddhist temples in Singapore. 

Thian Hock Keng Temple Singapore
Late 19th century image of Thian Hock Keng in Singapore


One of the places to admire Bonsai in Singapore is Jia Bonsai. Their address is at 86 Meng Suan Rd, Singapore 779273. They sell authentic Japanese Bonsai made affordable.




Another popular Bonsai artist is Boh Bonsai, in the heart of Singapore at 16 Lengkok Mariam, Singapore 509119, not too far from Tanah Merah. They run Bonsai exhibitions for various occasions in Singapore.




Another popular Bonsai spot is Bonsai gallery, Bonsai Gallery was founded in 2005 and can let you in all the secrets of this tradition and guide you through making the most suitable purchase. Bonsai gallery is at 24 Bah Soon Pah Road,Singapore 769968. I have not found any video of bonsai gallery, but here is the link to their website


Bonsai Tree From China to Singapore
There are more than 2000 Bonsai trees imported from China to Singapore and other parts of the world.


Bonsai Garden in Singapore
The traditional Bonsai artists believe that the purpose of miniature cultivation is to promote the shrinking of human foibles such as greed and self centered thinking.

Greed and self centered thinking promote the unthinking destruction of all of nature according to the belief. With the evidence of what is happening in our world, I would echo that belief. When Bonsai branches stretch toward the sky, means that they representing the seeking of a richer thought process of enlightenment. Many of these Bonsai trees in Singapore are over 100 years old. One of the oldest trees is in the Tokyo Imperial Palace collection. It is considered to be a national treasure of Japan. The tree is considered to be at least 500 years old. 

Its a beautiful and relaxing atmosphere in Singapore's most exciting Bonsai garden.


The 7-storey Chinese pagoda in Singapore's Jurong Lake Gardens 
public park.




Interesting Bonsai articles can be found here:

Please click here for more information on --> Chinese Penjing Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Origins of Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Art of Saikei Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Japanese Tanuki Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> How to Water a Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Bonsai Healing Methods




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Japanese Gardens and Contemporary Building Design

Contemporary House

Japanese gardens are another amazing gift from Asia, which have given many modern homes a soothing and serene ambiance that many of us know how to treasure. One consequence of this philosophical richness is that the Japanese expect gardens to be active all year round. The notion that the gardener should submit to a fallow period in winter is anathema, as is the summer-oriented concept of a lawn edged with flowerbeds. Many different types of garden have been cultivated in Japan over the centuries notably the tea garden, organised around the tea house and chado ceremony, and the dry karesansui rock garden, dominated by gravel and carefully placed stones. But most have one thing in common: they have developed alongside Zen Buddhism, from which much of their symbolism and poetic thoughtfulness derives. 


The idea of recreating Japanese gardens in the west is, thus, fraught with the risk of cultural blunders; one can so easily mistake a revered object such as the dimly lit lantern representing a long-departed patriarch for a mere ornament. However, there is much to gain from seeing nature through Japanese eyes, forearmed with knowledge of why their gardens look the way they do.

Japanese style landscape

Japan’s gardens seek to emulate its wild, mountainous landscape in miniature, reflecting the Buddhist ideal of voyaging out into the wilderness and taking solace in nature. Many early Japanese gardens were influenced by Chinese ink-brush paintings brought to Buddhist temples in ancient times, resulting in a restrained palette that’s still used today: there is a preference for greenery over flowers and subtle variations in tone that evoke light and shadow. The 15th-century Funda-in temple garden in Kyoto is planted with a traditional mix of pine trees, moss and rocks and is seen through the sliding doors and windows of a tea house, which compose the view as a frame does around a painting. Similarly green but designed to be walked around is the 19th century Tairyu-Sanso garden, also in Kyoto.

Prairie Contemporary House

Perhaps where the Japanese garden tradition differs most from its European counterpart is in its approach to flowers, which are a much rarer presence. Certain flowers are used in planting schemes, but chiefly as symbols of the fleetingness of life the Camellia Japonica, for instance, whose blooms fall not petal by petal but whole in one short, dramatic seasonal event. Each spring at the 15th century Taizo in temple garden in Kyoto, cherry trees briefly unfurl canopies of pink blossom over austere karesansui dry landscaping. Anyone preparing to populate their plot with manicured trees, rocks and moss might first consider that the Japanese way of gardening involves more than just green fingers

Awesome garden residence in Savannah

Enough said about the Japanese garden philosophy. Going back to contemporary housing to its extreme, the sleek materials and minimalist approach of modern landscaping can sometimes seem cold or uninviting. Yet modern designs emphasis on crafting an organized space and respecting unadorned materials has the potential to create a setting which feels not only friendly and inviting, but also personalized and artful. In a modern landscape, there is enough organization in the landscape that you have the option to go more natural in the plantings. This article you will find some ideas, or at least it helps you to imagine architecture as well as the ideal landscape that matches the surrounding of your area.

contemporary prairie housing surrounded by greenery

A sterile, lifeless appearance is a common pitfall in modern design. There is an emphasis on the use of solid materials, which is to say they aren’t pretending to be something they are not. For example, a simple concrete patio is more honest than is concrete that has been stamped and colored to look like flagstone. 

The layout of the landscape also plays a part in adding warmth. Contemporary landscapes are designed to act as an extension of the home, and with busy modern schedules, the ambiance at night is as important as during the day. Cool toned lighting gives off an eerie, off putting glow, and should be avoided. A design comes together most fully when the focal points, furnishings, and artful touches combine for a space that is customized and connected to the owners and the surroundings. 

forrest prairie housing

Lastly, the seasonal visits from hummingbirds, butterflies, and bumbling bees is a lighthearted addition to the garden which keeps it from becoming static. I hope you've found this blog post interesting, the aim is to give you a glimpse of an idea in landscaping. Please dong forget to subscribe, thank you!

Interesting Bonsai articles can be found here:

Please click here for more information on --> Chinese Penjing Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Origins of Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Art of Saikei Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Japanese Tanuki Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> How to Water a Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Bonsai Healing Methods





The World's Most Expensive Mushrooms



Mushrooms are consumed in almost every part of the world. Previously they were used only as natural medicines and compresses but later on people started consuming them too. Mushrooms can be grown either naturally or in commercial indoor growing areas. There are various kinds of mushrooms available all around the world. Different kinds of mushrooms have different kinds of price rates. But the mushrooms which are considered to be true edible delicacies are basically too expensive. These kinds of mushrooms are difficult to harvest and cultivate and are very rarely cultivated. Given below are the top five costliest mushrooms available in the world:

Yartsa Gunbu: Cordyceps sinesis Yartsa Gunbu Yarsagumba - These mushrooms grow out from the bodies of ghost moth caterpillars when the parasitic fungus eats away the body of the caterpillar which ultimately leads to its death. These mushrooms are harvested in the Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau.They generally cost around $2,000 an ounce. These mushrooms are considered to be a symbol of status in those areas in which they are grown.




European white truffle: These mushrooms are considered to be the second most expensive mushrooms in the world. They cost around $3,600 per pound. They are too expensive because it is very much difficult to harvest them. These mushrooms are mostly found in France and Italy where they have a great demand in the markets. The scarcity of these mushrooms has led to the emergence of a black market where they are sold at much higher rates.

White Truffles


Matsutake: This mushroom is considered to be a true delicacy by the Japanese people. It has a spicy and fruity aroma. Its price ranges from $1,000 to $2,000 per pound. These mushrooms grow naturally on red pine trees as there are no new methods developed by human beings for cultivating them. Matsutake is also considered to be an endangered species of mushroom because it is found only in a few regions where there are red pine trees. There are many kinds of mushrooms that are used for certain types of delicacies or cuisines. An example of a mushroom that is highly popular in some countries is truffle. Usually used either as an ingredient or as oil, truffles are loved by many due to its distinct taste and the aroma it gives to the dishes. However, in Japan, probably the most loved mushroom of all is the matsutake. Even though it is considerably simple to harvest matsutake mushrooms, they are still quite rare due to their specific requirements for them to be able to grow. The appropriate forest and terrain wherein the mushrooms would be able to grow in is also rare. Furthermore, there is the competition between humans and wild animals, such as rabbits, squirrels, and deer, which feed on these mushrooms when it is time for harvest. In Japan, the local production of matsutake has decreased over the last 50 years because of the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which kills pines. Hence, matsutake mushrooms are incredibly expensive.



At present, the annual harvest of these mushrooms in the Land of the Sun could not even reach a thousand tons. The supply of this mushroom in Japan is largely composed of imports from Korea, China, Northern Europe, and the North American Pacific Northwest. While it is generally expensive to purchase matsutake in Japan, the price depends on factors such as its availability, origin, and quality to name a few.

Japan Matsutake Mushrooms



Morels:
The dried forms of these mushrooms have a very high demand. This is because these mushrooms have a very light weight and it takes a lot of them to make even a pound. They generally cost around $254 per pound. On the other hand, the fresh morals range from $30 to $90 per pound. They are available in the United States between the months of March and May. They are found in sufficient quantity in the states of the Midwest. These mushrooms are very difficult to find because they are mostly surrounded by trees in the forest areas.




Chanterelles:
These mushrooms basically grow in the coniferous. These Chanterelles come in various colors like golden, orange, yellow and white. These mushrooms have specific growing conditions which make them very much expensive. The prices of dried Chanterelles range from around $224 per pound. Chanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. The chanterelle's aroma is variously described as apricot- or peachlike. It is unmistakably different and identifiable.

Chanterelles will reappear in the same places year after year if carefully harvested so as not to disturb the ground in which the mycelium (the vegetative part of the mushroom) grows. There are yearly variations--some years more mushrooms, some less. They fruit from September to February on the West Coast and almost all summer in the east, sometimes coming up in several flushes. We think of them as promiscuous in their plant relationships, because we have found their mycelial threads intertwined with the roots of hardwood trees, conifers, shrubs, and bushes. They enjoy deep, old leaf litter. Chanterelles are seldom invaded by insects. And forest animals do not share our interest in them as food.



So, these are the top five most expensive mushrooms in the world. Although they come in expensive prices, they are considered to be one of the most happening delicacies in the world.

How To Get Rid of Mosquito's

Asian Tiger Mosquito

How to get rid of mosquito's is not rocket science. There are actually many ways to reach the same result and there are other ways to drastically reduce the number of unwanted mosquito. I have been using some of these methods successfully till today, some require more effort whereas some solution require practically no effort at all. In order to understand how this works, we must understand two crucial approaches, its either ''only a dead mosquito is a good mosquito or keep mosquito at bay but dont kill em''. Having said that, lets dive further into this matter. There are more than 3,500 species of mosquitoes. About 175 of them are found in the United States, with the Anopheles quadrimaculatus, Culex pipiens,Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquito) among the most common. Not all mosquitos carry diseases, but several species can transmit potentially dangerous diseases like Zika and West Nile Virus. Mosquito species have different activity patterns and feeding preferences (some bite birds; others prefer mammals like us humans), but they all share the same basic life cycle and habitat preferences, which means you can control them all the same way. The techniques that work best have one thing in common: they make your home inhospitable to pests.



An alternative method is the box fan method, economic and very efficient.


Mesh Food Cover: https://amzn.to/2X2J66S 
Binder Clips: https://amzn.to/2K9jQqu

Or BTI bacillus naturally non toxic to environment. This is one of the most effortless methods. What does BTI actually do? Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis (Bti) bacteria is found in soil. Bti is used as a larvicide to kill larvae before they can grow into adults that can bite people. Bti has been used for mosquito control for more than 30 years.




BTI mosquito control: https://amzn.to/2NBRJ5j
Bits can be sprinkled on the soils surface or mixed with potting soil prior to planting will kill fungus gnat larvae with the same safety and target specific control offered for mosquito larvae.

Mosquito control bacillus BTI


Another way to drastically reduce the number of mosquito in your backyard is to have dragonflies. Yes, each dragonfly can eat around 100 mosquito's per day. So if you happen to have a pond, a dragonfly will do the rest. And if that is not enough, a gold fish or two in your pond will make sure that your pond stays mosquito larvae free.




Another way to get rid of mosquito is by purple LED light. It's basically an electric mosquito killer gadget. I personally have never used this gadget before, perhaps this review gives a glimpse on how this thing works. Many people use it for camping activities and some use this mosquito killer gadget at their terrace after 6pm.




Mosquito Trap Gadget - The perfect mosquito killing machine



Most mosquitoes can fly no more than one to three miles, and some mosquitoes such as the Asian tiger mosquito have a flight range of just 100 yards or so. So they're always looking for a place to land or a place to lay eggs, and water is an attractive option. Eliminate standing water where mosquitoes breed by emptying the saucers for plants, hauling off old tires, cleaning rain gutters and frequently changing the water in birdbaths. Don't leave pet bowls filled with water outside when your pets are indoors. Look out for water that gathers in pool covers, buckets and trash cans. Even discarded Frisbees, toys and lids can collect water after it rains and attract mosquitoes.

Walk around your property with an eye for puddles. Fix the problem, and mosquitoes won't have a place to lay eggs. Stock ornamental ponds with mosquito fish that eat the larva or treat the water with larvicide mosquito rings sold at home and garden stores.

Like their fellow bloodsuckers, vampires, adult mosquitoes rest during daylight. Mosquitoes spend daylight hours hiding among vegetation. Reduce mosquito shelter in your yard by trimming weeds and keeping the grass short.

You can get rid of mosquitoes by attracting bats, one of their most-feared predators. In one night, one single brown bat can eat 1,000 mosquito-sized insects.

To make that dinnertime feat easier, why not install a bat house to create a mosquito-free yard? Typically made of wood, bat houses can take many forms and can be many sizes. They can be small, backyard boxes or freestanding towers on tall poles to support colonies. Place the house where it will get at least six hours of sunlight per day, facing south, east or southeast in most climates and paint the outside a dark color to absorb heat.








Dragonflies for Mosquito Control

Awesome example of a dragonfly


Did you know that one Dragonfly can eat over hundreds of mosquito's a day. Keep some beautiful plants in your yard to attract Dragonflies. It’s possible to help reduce mosquito populations around your house without using nasty chemicals. Did you know that dragonflies are the biggest predators of mosquito's and can eat hundreds of them a day? This makes them a great addition to your garden and the safest natural pest control. They keep mosquito population in check.


Dragonflies eat mosquitoes, both at the larval stage and as adults. Having a few dragonflies in your backyard will ensure mosquitoes do not trouble you during a high mosquito season. Another interesting fact is that Dragonflies are carnivorous in their minds, bodies and soul. A fun fact here. A Dragonfly can eat food equal to its own weight in about 30 minutes. Which roughly translates into a you trying to eat as much as 100 lb, let alone in half an hour. We don’t eat that amount of food in a week!


From the time they get out of their eggs as little nymphs, their limbs and mouth yearn for meat and seek out prey underwater. They are extremely fast swimmers and will eat just about anything that moves under the water surface and on. They have a hyper-thrust mechanism to give them the extra speed-boost when they are pursuing a critter that gives the Dragonfly nymph a run for its money. For a quick burst of speed, they eject water from their anal opening to act like a jet propulsion system, which makes it a near impossible feat for the nymph Dragonfly’s prey to even think of an escape.

If you think this is spectacular, wait till you hear this. Occasionally, the nymph will venture out of the water to get a quick snack from the land. It does this with such nonchalance that when seen this way, one would never really consider the dragonfly nymph to be primarily aquatic, and never ‘ever’ an aquatic insect with gills. As Nymphs, the Dragonflies eat mosquito larvae, other aquatic insects and worms, and for a little variety even small aquatic vertebrates like tadpoles and small fish.

Dragonfly catching mosquitos at a pond
Dragonfly catching mosquito's at a pond
Adult Dragonflies are born rulers of their domain and they prove it to just about every insect that thinks it can pull a fast one on this killing machine. The adult dragonfly uses the basket formed by its legs to catch insects while flying. The adult Dragonfly likes to eat gnats, mayflies, flies, mosquitoes and other small flying insects. They sometimes eat butterflies, moths and bees too.

From bees to mosquitoes, Dragonflies make a meal out of what they please and can hunt down insects on a whim, callously plucking them out of thin air after out-flying outmaneuvering and them in the chase that does not normally last very long.

To give you a little insight, the dragonfly that is many times the size of a mosquito or a housefly needs to flap its wings a mere 30 times a minute when compared to a mosquito’s 600 times a minute and the housefly’s 1000 flaps a minute requirement to keep them flying and in peak maneuverability. Such is the power that the dragonfly is equipped with and given its low-energy speed capability, very, very few insects can escape its basket shaped grabbing limbs that it uses to clutch on to its prey before crushing the critter into a gooey mass, with its powerful mandibles and swallowing it.




Adult Dragonflies eat just about anything that is edible and can be caught. They are a treasure for humanity because they keep mosquito populations under strict control by feasting on them when they are in abundance. Similarly, they also feed on ants, termites, butterflies, gnats, bees and other insects and tend to hunt in groups when large colonies of ants or termites are spotted.

They are considered a pest by apiaries because they can polish off a good chunk of the bee population before one can realize the threat looming large.

Writing about what dragonflies eat makes one wonder what would be the case if some of the older dragonfly species that have been found as fossils existed today. These fossil species belonging to the Meganeura genus were carnivorous insects with wings spreading to spans in the range of two and a half feet and made their food out of other insects and even small amphibians. If they were still alive today, we’d have to constantly watch our small pets to be sure they didn’t end up a Dragonfly’s lunch!



Some plants that attract Dragonflies are floating plants that are not rooted under the water are also necessary for any dragonfly habitat. Females will lay their eggs on the underside of the plant or on the stems. The Western water lily is hardy in zones 10 and 11 and fanworts, which will grow in zones 6 through 11, are attractive options. Emergent plants are those that are rooted on the bottom of ponds but have stems and leaves that rise out of the water. Dragonflies love these plants because they use them during both nymph and adult stages. Water horsetail grows well in zones 4 through 11 and is a lovely dark green emergent plant that has a hollow stem with a few branches.

Dragonfly on a lotus flower



Interesting Bonsai articles can be found here:

Please click here for more information on --> Chinese Penjing Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Origins of Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Art of Saikei Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Japanese Tanuki Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> How to Water a Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Bonsai Healing Methods


Fertilizing Bonsai - Care Guide Tutorial

Organic Bonsai fertilizer review - Care Guide Tutorial for Bonsai Enthusiasts



Bonsai Fertilizer Explained

The best fertilizer is a bonsai fertilizer specifically formulated to provide an optimum level of salt in the soil solution when used as directed. In other words, Fertilizer is simply an alternate source of all the basic nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, and trace minerals that exist naturally in a healthy soil. Fertilizer feeds the soil, not the bonsai. Fertilizer breaks down in the soil, either by being dissolved in water or by microbial action, releasing its nutrients in a form that plant roots can absorb. Plants use nitrogen for leaf production, phosphorus for root and flower production, and potassium for flower production and general vigor. General purpose fertilizers are typically balanced. They contain all three major nutrients which are present in the proportions likely to be found in a healthy soil. These general purpose fertilizers are suitable for use on lawns, trees, shrubs, flowers, even vegetable gardens where there are no special problems with the soil.

Special purpose fertilizers are typically "unbalanced" featuring a greater proportion of one or the other major nutrients or special trace minerals or enzymes that suit them for particular situations or bonsai. For instance, there are bonsai fertilizers labeled for acid-loving plants such as azaleas that help provide iron in a form that these plants can use. Let the directions on the fertilizer be your guide and, when possible, use a specialized bonsai fertilizer to maintain its health. 

Fertilizing regularly during the growth season is crucial for your Bonsai to survive. Normal trees are able to extend their root system looking for nutrients; Bonsai however are planted in rather small pots and need to be fertilized in order to replenish the soil's nutritional content. I've found a very interesting video from an experienced Filipino Bonsai enthusiast that explains fertilizing methods.



What is NPK on fertilizer labels?

Don't be intimidated by the three-number code on bags of fertilizer. It indicates the levels of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the fertilizer. Nitrogen is responsible for the intensity of the color green in the plant. Phosphorous is good for maintaining the root system as well as the plant's blooming and fruiting. Potassium is necessary for the general vitality of the plant. You can read our article for more information about NPK.

What's the difference between liquid fertilizers and granular pellets?

Fertilizer is available in two types: liquid and granular. Choose the one that meets your needs in the form that is easiest for you to use. Liquid fertilizers are fast-acting and quickly absorbed. However, liquid fertilizers require more applications. Every time you water your bonsai, your washing away the fertilizer you previously applied. Granular fertilizers are applied dry and must be watered in. Granular fertilizers are easier to control because you can actually see how much fertilizer you are using and where it is being dispersed. Both fertilizer types are appropriate for bonsai gardeners, and most bonsai gardeners will use both types of fertilizer for maximum balance. 

Is there an advantage to using organic fertilizer?

The major elements needed for your bonsai are N, P, and K. The source doesn't matter to the plant. The salts will ultimately be employed by the bonsai in exactly the same fashion. The major benefit of organic fertilizer is that it releases nitrogen slowly and it is less likely to burn the roots of the bonsai if you accidentally over-fertilize. Some fertilizers, such as chicken manure or liquid fish-meal, have a distinct odor, so you may not want to use them on indoor bonsai. However, not all organic fertilizer will smell bad.

Also, organic fertilizers do not always contain all of the trace elements and minerals your bonsai needs. Therefore, you may need to apply several different organic fertilizers or apply them more frequently to compensate. It may be a good idea to alternate fertilizers (organic and non-organic) from time to time in order to give your bonsai a mixture of trace elements.

No matter which fertilizer you choose, the most important thing is to follow the directions on the package. Using too much fertilizer or using it too frequently increases the risk of damage to your bonsai.

Are there times when I should avoid fertilizing my bonsai?

Yes. Probably the most important rule about fertilizing is to never feed a tree that is under stress. You should never feed a newly re-potted tree, a dry tree, or a tree during dormancy. After re-potting, leave the bonsai alone for at least a month before starting feeding again.

Please see product review below, you can click on images for more details about the specific product.




Liquid and Non-Liquid Bonsai Fertilizers



Dyna-Gro - Professional liquid plant food fertilizer for Bonsai - Made in the USA


  • Brand: Dyna-Gro
  • Rated: 4.5 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: liquid form
  • Price: below $10
  • Indoor plants: mix 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon per gallon of water with every watering
  • Outdoor plants: mix 1/2 teaspoon per gallon of water with every watering
  • Monthly feeding: mix 1 teaspoon per gallon
  • Hydroponic: 2-3 teaspoons per gallon of water for re-circulation type systems
  • 1 teaspoon per gallon for non-recirculating
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Uncle Bills Bonsai Brew - Bonsai Fertilizer by New England Bonsai - Made in the USA



  • Brand: New England Bonsai Gardens
  • Rated: 4.5 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: liquid form
  • Price: $10 - $15
  • This premium bonsai fertilizer one of the best in the market according to reviews and is essential to keeping your bonsai trees healthy and strong.
  • Exclusive to New England Bonsai Gardens, a low dose 3-3-3 can be used for bonsai almost year round.
  • This water soluble bonsai fertilizer is odor free and especially recommended by bonsai professionals for indoor bonsai trees.
  • Contains Nitrogen for healthy foliage, Potassium for healthy root growth, and Phosphorous for bright and colorful flowers and fruits.
  • 1/8 ounce bottle should last about a year for a small bonsai (up to an eight (8) inch pot). Direct from New England Bonsai Gardens.
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Superfly efficient bonsai non liquid fertilizer made in the USA


  • Brand: Superfly Bonsai
  • Rated: 4.0 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: Non-liquid form
  • Price: $10 - $15
  • Slow Release - Special blend fertilizes immediately and throughout a 1-2 month period.
  • NPK optimized for Bonsai - Nitrogen (N) – for the growth of leaves on the plant. Phosphorus (P) for root growth, flower and fruit development. Potassium (K) for overall plant health.
  • According to instruction it's safe and easy to use - 1/4 Pellets can be picked up by hand or with a spoon
  • Rich in premium organic & natural ingredients
  • Easy Zip and resealable bag
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Tinyroots organic bonsai pellet fertilizer imported from Japan


  • Brand: Tinyroots
  • Rated: 5.0 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: Non-liquid form
  • Price: $10 - $15
  • Most popular time release organic bonsai fertilizer. Always fresh stock from Japan.
  • Biogold is specially formulated for Bonsai, but will also work well with a wide range of plants.
  • Fermented - no bad smells. Does not attract insects, no mold growth.
  • Contains the three essential elements (Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potash) and micro-nutrients to produce a balanced fertilizer.
  • Triangular pellets - Will not roll off and out of your pot.
  • Imported fertilizer from Japan



All purpose blend premium bonsai soil by tinyroots made in the USA


  • Brand: Tinyroots
  • Rated: 4.5 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: Non-liquid form
  • Price: $15 - $20
  • This soil provides the plant support, moisture & drainage Bonsai trees need.
  • The soil component is a mix of 100% organic double-sifted compost mulch, calcined clay, vermiculite and Frit. It contains over 28 vital trace elements and minerals that are essential for the health of your Bonsai.
  • Perfectly blended for Ficus, Chinese Elms, Jades, Junipers, and other Bonsai species - two quarts of all-purpose blend Bonsai soil mix. 100% Organic and All-Natural Bonsai soil.
  • Specially formulated as an all-purpose potting medium for virtually any Bonsai tree.
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Organic liquid bonsai fertilizer - Proudly made in the USA



  • Brand: BonsaiOutlet
  • Rated: 4.5 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: Liquid form
  • Price: $15 - $20
  • Nitrogen-free fertilizer for Bonsai. Use this 0:10:10 fertilizer during the winter months and for newly transplanted Bonsai trees.
  • Formulated without nitrogen so it doesn't promote foliage growth, this formulation still provides a balanced delivery of phosphorus and potassium to keep your Bonsai tree's root system healthy and happy.
  • Made with natural-based fish. Rich in phosphorus and potassium, this unique formula stimulates budding and flowering, as well as vigorous root growth. Use this product on all types of flowering plants for abundant colorful blooms.
  • Spring feeding pines with 0-10-10 will help reduce needle length and candle extension, and encourages sturdy shoots. Fall feeding all trees with 0-10-10 will help to prevent nonseasonal soft growth that will not withstand winter, and will increase cold hardiness of the roots.
  • 8oz bottle contains enough to make 16 gallons.
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Eve's Garden special blend fertilizer for Bonsai



  • Brand: Eve's Garden Special Blend
  • Rated: It's a new product
  • Type: Non liquid form
  • Price: Below $10.00
  • Slow Release 16-9-12 Granular Bonsai Fertilizer
  • Time released Fertilizer, apply every 5-8 months on the surface of soil
  • Last for months of the year, essential to keep your tree healthy and strong
  • Safe for any house plants according to Eve's Garden
  • Sold Only by Eve's Garden in 5 oz pack in a resealable zip lock bag, enough for many Bonsai trees
  • Made in the U.S.A.



Green Dream Organic Bonsai fertilizer improved formula



  • Brand: BonsaiOutlet Green Dream
  • Rated: 4.0 stars on Amazon (Customers reviews here)
  • Type: Non liquid form
  • Price: $20 - $30
  • Brings rapid and lush growth, Certified 100% Organic. Will keep your Bonsai trees happy healthy and thriving for years to come.
  • Perfectly balanced Bonsai fertilizer. N:P;K ratio of 7:5:5 balanced for Bonsai of all types.
  • Tiny 4mm pellets are absorbed by soil quickly. Harmless to pets and fish, including Bonsai ponds.
  • Recommended for outdoor use but safe indoors, Active organic components sterilized for safe handling according to manufacturer
  • Made in the U.S.A.






Interesting Bonsai articles can be found here:

Please click here for more information on --> Chinese Penjing Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Origins of Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Art of Saikei Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Japanese Tanuki Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> How to Water a Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Bonsai Healing Methods


Thank you for visiting my blog and feel free to subscribe to this blog and leave your message on the comment section below. Remember, good feedbags or bad remarks, it doesn't matter!


Japanese Snacks


Interesting Books on Bonsai can be found here:

The Complete Book of Bonsai --> I've been into bonsai for 25 years and this is the basic Bible for beginner and intermediate bonsai enthusiasts. It has an excellent section on techniques, including pruning, wiring and whatnot, and it has a large species-specific tree guide. If you're into bonsai and want only one book, this is it.

Indoor Bonsai The Great Selection --> Creating beautiful, healthy bonsai is a wonderful skill that anyone can learn, with a little time, patience, and this all-inclusive manual. With color photos and drawings to illustrate the points, it introduces all the cultivation techniques; offers expert advice on location, soil types, watering, and pest control; and provides intricate instruction on training the bonsai--including pruning, wiring and stretching it.

The Secret Techniques of Bonsai --> In The Secret Techniques of Bonsai, the author of the groundbreaking Bonsai With American Trees teams up with his son to offer not only the basics for creating perfect bonsai, but also secret techniques they’ve developed over years of careful work and observation.

Bonsai Survival Manual --> Problem solving when your Bonsai get sick. Expand your gardening repertoire as you create a captivating and exquisite miniature world. In this introductory guide, Colin Lewis covers everything you need to know to design, grow, and successfully maintain attractive bonsai.

Bonsai and the art of Penjing --> Bonsai & Penjing, Ambassadors of Beauty and Peace describes how Chinese penjing and North American bonsai were later added to the Museum, making its collection the most comprehensive in the world. Stories of individual trees and forest plantings are featured, as are the roles played by the skilled and talented creators of these living art forms people such as John Naka, Saburo Kato, Yuji Yoshimura, Harry Hirao, and Dr. Yee-Sun Wu.

Bonsai with Japanese Maples --> With their delicate foliage, seasonal color changes, and intricate pattern of branching, Japanese maples are among the most popular and suitable plants for bonsai design. In this long-awaited book, internationally renowned expert Peter Adams discusses both the specific horticultural needs of Japanese maples as bonsai subjects and illustrates proven techniques for creating and maintaining beautiful specimens.

The Modern Bonsai Practice --> The most current, useful information on growing Bonsai. Fresh, practical, definitive, comprehensive reference guide to the finest art of horticulture: growing miniature trees. Common sense bonsai answers separating myth from fact with depth and detail. Appropriate for both bonsai hobbyists and experienced practitioners.


The art of Bonsai and Penjing - From the collection of the National Bonsai and Penjing museum in Washington D.C.




The Taikan-Ten International Bonsai Exhibition in Kyoto, Japan

Magestic Bonsai on Display - Picture taken by Julian Tsai courtesy of Bonsai Empire


The Taikan Ten Exhibition

The building is just down the street from the famous Heian Shrine, well known for a large and impressive tori gate. This exhibition is perhaps the second largest and most prestigious bonsai exhibition in Japan. I particularly like this show because it features displays. Both bonsai, suiseki and art objects are formally displayed, many with scrolls. This is not the common traditional bonsai exhibition. There were a few contemporary displays as well in good taste too.The Taikan-ten is one of Japan's leading Bonsai exhibitions, with an incredibly high level of Bonsai trees on display. It takes place each year in November, in the city of Kyoto Japan. The Taikan-ten is one of the few traditional shows that features Bonsai in displays, with scrolls and suiseki. But several contemporary displays can be found as well. The best of show is awarded the Prime Minister Award and some of the Bonsai masterpieces may reach easily 160thousand dollars.

The entrance of Bonsai Taikan exhibition in Kyoto Japan
The entrance of Bonsai Taikan exhibition in Kyoto Japan

Bonsai on display at Taikan Ten Exhibition in Kyoto Japan
Source: Julian Tsai & Bonsai Empire

Epic Bonsai on display at Taikan Ten exhibition in Kyoto Japan
Source: Julian Tsai & Bonsai Empire


The walkway hall at Taikan Ten Bonsai exhibition in Kyoto, Japan


Numerous visitors admiring Bonsai on display at Takan Ten exhibition held in Kyoto, Japan





An interesting fact is although all the bonsai are beautiful, not all are of the high Kokufu Bonsai Exhibition quality. Professional bonsai artists nominate the bonsai for entry. There are two general sizes of display and I believe the entry fee is US $500 and $1,000 per display areas. The trees are classified by size, large, medium and small, and by type, evergreen, deciduous, satsuki, shohin bonsai, literati, forest and rock plantings. The suiseki are classified as those in water basins, daiza bases and figure stones. Most of the Bonsai exhibitions are in Autumn, that is when the Bonsai trees manifest their true beauty on display. 

Taiken-Ten Bonsai exhibition - most of Bonsai exhibition are in autumn, thats when the trees manifest their true beauty



Autumn Bonsai on display manifesting their true beauty at Taikan Ten International Bonsai exhibition in Kyoto Japan




Epic Bonsai trees on display at the Taikan-Ten Bonsai Exhibition in Kyoto Japan
Source: Julian Tsai & Bonsai Empire

Bonsai tree in autumn on display at the Taikan-Ten Bonsai exhibition in Kyoto Japan
 Source: Julian Tsai & Bonsai Empire


Expensive Bonsai tree on display at Taikan-ten Bonsai exhibition in Kyoto
Source: Julian Tsai & Bonsai Empire


Interesting Bonsai articles can be found here:

Please click here for more information on --> Chinese Penjing Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Origins of Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> The Art of Saikei Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Japanese Tanuki Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> How to Water a Bonsai
Please click here for more information on --> Bonsai Healing Methods


Thank you for visiting my blog and feel free to subscribe to this blog and leave your message on the comment section below. Remember, good feedbacks or bad remarks, it doesn't matter!


Interesting Books on Bonsai can be found here:

The Complete Book of Bonsai --> I've been into bonsai for 25 years and this is the basic Bible for beginner and intermediate bonsai enthusiasts. It has an excellent section on techniques, including pruning, wiring and whatnot, and it has a large species-specific tree guide. If you're into bonsai and want only one book, this is it.

Indoor Bonsai The Great Selection --> Creating beautiful, healthy bonsai is a wonderful skill that anyone can learn, with a little time, patience, and this all-inclusive manual. With color photos and drawings to illustrate the points, it introduces all the cultivation techniques; offers expert advice on location, soil types, watering, and pest control; and provides intricate instruction on training the bonsai--including pruning, wiring and stretching it.

The Secret Techniques of Bonsai --> In The Secret Techniques of Bonsai, the author of the groundbreaking Bonsai With American Trees teams up with his son to offer not only the basics for creating perfect bonsai, but also secret techniques they’ve developed over years of careful work and observation.

Bonsai Survival Manual --> Problem solving when your Bonsai get sick. Expand your gardening repertoire as you create a captivating and exquisite miniature world. In this introductory guide, Colin Lewis covers everything you need to know to design, grow, and successfully maintain attractive bonsai.

Bonsai and the art of Penjing --> Bonsai & Penjing, Ambassadors of Beauty and Peace describes how Chinese penjing and North American bonsai were later added to the Museum, making its collection the most comprehensive in the world. Stories of individual trees and forest plantings are featured, as are the roles played by the skilled and talented creators of these living art forms people such as John Naka, Saburo Kato, Yuji Yoshimura, Harry Hirao, and Dr. Yee-Sun Wu.

Bonsai with Japanese Maples --> With their delicate foliage, seasonal color changes, and intricate pattern of branching, Japanese maples are among the most popular and suitable plants for bonsai design. In this long-awaited book, internationally renowned expert Peter Adams discusses both the specific horticultural needs of Japanese maples as bonsai subjects and illustrates proven techniques for creating and maintaining beautiful specimens.

The Modern Bonsai Practice --> The most current, useful information on growing Bonsai. Fresh, practical, definitive, comprehensive reference guide to the finest art of horticulture: growing miniature trees. Common sense bonsai answers separating myth from fact with depth and detail. Appropriate for both bonsai hobbyists and experienced practitioners.